Women's Health

Women and girls make up just over half of Victoria’s population. Victorian women are living longer, but with more chronic illness and more years living with a disability. Further, their patterns of disease differ as they age, and from the disease patterns among men.

Compared with men, women have higher rates of mental, sexual and reproductive ill-health and morbidity. They also have different cancer patterns and main causes of death. Over half of women’s deaths in Victoria are from heart failure, with two thirds from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

All of our doctors provide comprehensive women's health care including breast checks, gynaecological and contraceptive advice. We also have doctors who are accredited to insert Implanon devices and provide antenatal shared care for our expectant mothers. 

Women's Health Clinic 

PLMG is running a Women's Health Clinic on the 2nd Saturday of every month.

This clinic will provide a full range of contraceptive advice and options, advice on menopause, reproductive health and preventative health care including pap smears and breast checks.

Please ring reception on (03)52580888 or BOOK ONLINE.

Pre Pregnancy and Early Pregnancy Care

 

It may be helpful to make a double appointment for pre pregnancy advice. At this consultation, pathology is taken for antenatal screens, immunisations are updated, family history taken for genetic counselling and advice given on pregnancy vitamins and the changes in lifestyle required.

 

Once pregnancy is confirmed, referrals are given for first trimester maternal serum screening and referrals to hospitals and obstetrics. Referrals are also made to a radiology service for diagnostic screening.

Antenatal Shared Care

Antenatal Shared Care is the division of care of pregnant women between the general practitioner and the hospital antenatal clinic. At Point Lonsdale Medical Group, we have doctors that provide Shared Antenatal Care. It is important to inform Reception Staff that a shared antenatal consultation is required when booking an appointment.

 

Antenatal Shared Care (ANSC) is an option for pregnant women with no adverse maternal or foetal pregnancy risk factors. Your doctor will consult and can refer to the hospitals obstetric team if problems arise. Doctors and hospitals participating in the ANSC program must follow an agreed protocol.

 

After an initial assessment and referral by the general practitioner, the pregnant woman attends the hospital antenatal clinic for an obstetric assessment. She is then required to attend routine antenatal care with her doctor. This continues late into the pregnancy and the patient then returns to the antenatal clinic where the hospital is responsible for intrapartum care.

 

A shared antenatal record is completed by your doctor and hospital and it is important to bring this to each visit.

Post Natal Review

This is a 6 week post natal review with a 30 minute appointment for the woman and a 15 minute appointment for the baby. It is very important to bring the baby's Health and Development Book (Green book) along to every appointment so that data such as height, weight and vaccinations can be added to our records.

Women’s Mental Health and Injury

Economic, social and cultural disadvantage can worsen women’s health such as women from disadvantage, and when they have insufficient income.

 

Family violence has a major direct and indirect impact on women’s health. In fact, intimate partner violence is the major preventable health risk factor for Victorian women aged 15 to 44 years. In Victoria in 2013, family violence accounted for 42 per cent of crimes against the person and 44 deaths.

 

Our doctors are trained in caring for people with psychological and mental health issues, such as depression, anxiety and situational difficulties. They will ensure our patients receive the full support, guidance and understanding they require. Where required, they are also able to refer patients to extra service providers who are able to assist with counselling requirements 

 
Breast Cancer

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Australia and the second most common cancer to cause death in women, after lung cancer.

 

Breast cancer is the abnormal growth of the cells lining the breast lobules or ducts. These cells grow uncontrollably and have the potential to spread to other parts of the body. Both men and women can develop breast cancer, although it is uncommon in men.

The risk of developing breast cancer increases with age It is important to have 2 yearly mammograms when aged over 40 and these are provided free by Breastscreen to asymptomatic women. It is also important to regularly examine breasts after each period and to report any persisting changes to your doctor. Often benign conditions such as cysts are detected so not every lump means cancer.

Breast cancer in Australia

The following material has been sourced from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

 

Estimated number of new cases of breast cancer diagnosed in 2017 

 

17,730 =            144 males +              17,586 females

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated % of all new cancer cases diagnosed in 2017

13%

Estimated number of deaths from breast cancer in 2017

 

 

 

 

3,114 =           28 males +            3,087 females

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated % of all deaths from cancer in 2017

6.5%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chance of surviving at least 5 years (2009–2013)

90%

 

 

 

People living with breast cancer at the end of 2012 (diagnosed in the 5 year period 2008 to 2012)

Ovarian Cancer​

There are three types of ovarian cancer: the common epithelial type (90% of cases) that arises from the cells on the outside of the ovary; the germ cell type that arises from the cells which produce eggs; and the rare stromal type arising from supporting tissues within the ovary.

 

The risk increases with age over 50, family history, changes in the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2, early onset of periods and late cessation, childlessness, infertility and never taking the combined oral contraceptive. It often presents late and there is no proven prevention.

 

It is important to have regular pap smears and to report any changes such as pelvic pain, bloating, abnormal bleeding and lethargy.

Ovarian cancer in Australia

The following material has been sourced from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

 

Estimated number of new cases of ovarian cancer diagnosed in 2017

 

 

 

 

1,580           females

 

Estimated % of all new cancers in females diagnosed in 2017​

2.5%

 

Estimated number of deaths from ovarian cancer in 2017

 

 

 

 

1,047             females

 

Estimated % of all female deaths from cancer in 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.1%

 

Chance of surviving at least 5 years (2009–13)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

44.4%

 

People living with ovarian cancer in 2012 (diagnosed in the 5 year period 2008 to 2012)

 

 

 

 

 

 

3,980​

Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer was the 14th most commonly diagnosed cancer among females in Australia in 2017 and it is estimated that 912 new cases of cervical cancer will be diagnosed in Australia. The incidence rate for cervical cancer is expected to be highest for age group 35–39, followed by age groups 40–44 and 85+.

 

Our practice is proud that we achieve a high percentage of pap smears in eligible women. We have a computerized recall system and SMS messaging to remind you when your next check is due.

 

Cervical cancer is the growth of abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix. The most common cervical cancer is squamous cell carcinoma, accounting for 80% of cases. Adenocarcinoma is less common and more difficult to diagnose because it starts higher in the cervix.

 

All of our doctors can provide PAP smears and we also run a Women's Health Clinic on the 2nd Saturday of each month.

 

This clinic will provide a full range of contraceptive advice and options, advice on menopause, reproductive health and preventative health care including pap smears and breast checks.

 

Please ring reception on (03)52580888 or BOOK ONLINE.
Cervical cancer in Australia

The following material has been sourced from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

 

 

Estimated number of new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed in 2017

 

 

 

          912 females

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated % of all new female cancer cases diagnosed in 2017

1.5%

Estimated number of deaths from cervical cancer in 2017

 

 

 

 

            254 females

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Estimated % of all female deaths from cancer in 2017

1.2%

 

 

 

 

 

Chance of surviving at least 5 years (2009–2013)

72%

 

 

 

 

 

 

Females living with cervical cancer at the end of 2012 (diagnosed in the 5 year period 2008 to 2012)

3,165

In the event of a medical emergency

call the ambulance on 000

POINT LONSDALE MEDICAL GROUP WELCOMES YOU AND YOUR FAMILY TO OUR PRACTICE

Contact Us

Point Lonsdale Medical Group

4 Nelson Road, Point Lonsdale, Vic 3225

Phone: 03 52580888

Fax: 03 52582900

www.pointlonsdalemedicalgroup.com.au

Hours

Opening Hours

Monday to Thursday 7.30am to 7.00pm

Friday 7.30am to 5.00pm

Saturday 9.00am to 1.00pm

Sunday 10.00am to 12.00 noon

Public Holidays 9.00am to 12.00 noon

Phone Hours

Monday to Thursday 8.30am to 6.45pm

Friday 8.30am to 5.00pm

Saturday 9.00am to 1.00pm

After Hours

Outside of our normal hours of operation, Point Lonsdale Medical Group utilises the National Home Doctor Service to provide medical attention and assistance in emergencies. Please phone 13 74 25 when an urgent after-hour’s home visit is required.

© 2015 Point Lonsdale Medical Group